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The OC Health Care Agency Offers Triple P Free Parenting Support to Families

St Nick Ana, CA, April 12, 2021—The OC Health Care Agency (HCA) has joined forces with Triple P America, the supplier of the universally acclaimed nurturing program, Triple P – Positive Parenting Program, to offer Triple P Online free to all Orange County guardians. This is important for the region’s COVID-19 aid project supported via CARES (Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security) Act.

Each Orange County parent and guardian of youngsters and teenagers matured 0-16 can get to Triple P Online for nothing to learn master nurturing techniques that will help establish the best climate for their kid and construct their flexibility during these unsure occasions. The online program is accessible in three dialects—English, Spanish, and Arabic. When guardians join, they may demand one on one meetings with HCA parent contacts who have been prepared to help positive nurturing—additionally at no expense.

“The interruption brought about by COVID-19 has affected each Orange County family and put pressure particularly on guardians and kids. It possesses been an upsetting energy for some families with stresses over cash, work and additionally wellbeing,” said Dr. Jeff Nagel, Deputy Agency Director of the HCA’s Behavioral Health Services. “Guardians that select Triple P Online will learn clear and successful devices and procedures to all the more likely comprehend their kids’ feelings and guarantee good, sound turn of events. This makes versatile youngsters and families with kids who are more joyful, more sure and skilled.”

Triple P Online is the world’s initially demonstrated to-work internet nurturing program. Guardians acquire certainty through the program to deal with each new age, stage and circumstance confronting their kid. With online comfort, guardians can get to the program day in and day out by means of their phone, PC or tablet. They can do it when and where they like, and it takes under five minutes to join on the web.

“Youngsters need our assistance, particularly given the pressure and uneasiness they have encountered during the COVID-19 pandemic. Triple P Online empowers guardians to assist youngsters with dealing with their feelings of trepidation, adapt to commotion and fabricate strength. These are vital abilities that kids need through their lifetime,” said Randy Ahn, Implementation Consultant, Triple P America. “Triple P Online additionally assists guardians with getting less pushed. Positive cooperations that kids have with their folks at home assist youngsters with getting strong. Along these lines, what guardians do and say has an effect each day with youngsters, and this is simpler now with the right help on proposal to Orange County guardians and parental figures.”

Top 10 Tips for Parenting During COVID-19

1. Promise your kid that your family is first concern.

2. Deal with yourself all that can be expected.

3. Ensure your kids realize you are prepared to talk.

4. Be honest in responding to a youngster’s inquiries.

5. Keep up regular schedules.

6. Have a family plan.

7. Have a lot of intriguing activities at home.

8. Consider conduct you like.

9. Assist kids with enduring vulnerability.

10. Connect a lot with friends and family.

To begin Triple P Online today, go to

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Media Contacts

Triple P: Randy Ahn, Implementation Consultant, Triple P America: (310) 694-7566; randy@triplep.net

OC Health Care Agency: Julie MacDonald, Health Communications Manager: (714) 834-2178; hcacomm@ochca.com

405 W. fifth St.

St Nick Ana, CA 92701

HCA’s objectives portray how we will accomplish our vision and our central goal – the worth made, or the ideal improvement in a condition that is of direct outcome to our customers and people in general. Representatives’ individual presentation measures are, thus, founded on the Agency’s objectives and vital headings.

– Prevent sickness and incapacity, and advance sound ways of life.- – Assure admittance to quality medical care administrations.

– Promote and guarantee a fortifying climate.

– Recommend and execute wellbeing strategy and administrations dependent on appraisal of local area wellbeing needs.

Many years of examination shows that positive nurturing—nurturing in a commonsense, social, and self-administrative way—effectsly affects results for kids, while careless or unforgiving nurturing has enduring, unfortunate results. Positive nurturing can set a way for early learning status, better school accomplishment, better mental and actual wellbeing, and counteraction of substance abuse. In long haul examines, the impacts of

positive nurturing have been appeared to improve profession, pay, and life expectancy results. Free expense examinations show that Triple P can set aside governments cash.

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Politics

Biden to lay out vax donations, urge world leaders to join

One year ago, the U.S. was the deadliest hotspot of the COVID-19 pandemic, forcing the cancellation of the Group of Seven summit it was due to host. Now, the U.S. is emerging as a model for how to successfully emerge from more than 15 months of global crisis.

For President Joe Biden, who is meeting with leaders of the wealthy G-7 democracies on his first overseas trip since taking office, it’s a personal vindication of his pledge to turn around the U.S. virus, but also a call to action to enlist other countries in the global fight.

In a speech on the eve of the summit, Biden on Thursday will unveil plans for the U.S. to donate 500 million vaccine doses around the globe over the next year, on top of 80 million he has already pledged by the end of the month. U.S. officials say Biden will also include a direct request to his fellow G-7 leaders to do the same.

“We have to end COVID-19, not just at home — which we’re doing — but everywhere,” Biden told American servicemembers Wednesday on the first stop of his three-country, eight-day trip, adding that the effort “requires coordinated, multilateral action.”

“There’s no wall high enough to keep us safe from this pandemic or the next biological threat we face — and there will be others,” he added.

The U.S. has faced mounting pressure to outline its global vaccine sharing plan, especially as inequities in supply around the world have become more pronounced, and the demand for shots in the U.S. has dropped precipitously in recent weeks.

The new U.S. commitment is to purchase and donate 500 million Pfizer doses for distribution through the global COVAX alliance to 92 lower-income countries and the African Union, bringing the first steady supply of mRNA vaccine to the countries that need it most. The U.S. is now set to be COVAX’s largest vaccine donor in addition to its single largest funder with a $4 billion commitment.

The global alliance has thus far distributed just 81 million doses, and parts of the world, particularly in Africa, remain vaccine deserts.

After leading the world in new cases and deaths over much of the last year, the rapid vaccination program in the U.S. now positions the country among the leaders of the global recovery. Nearly 64% of adults in the U.S. have received at least one vaccine dose and the average numbers of new positive cases and deaths in the U.S. are lower now than at any point since the earliest days of the pandemic.

The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development last week projected that the U.S. economy would grow at a rate of 6.9% this year, making it one of the few nations for which forecasts are rosier now than before the pandemic.

U.S. officials are hopeful the summit will conclude with a communique showing a commitment from the G-7 countries and other invited nations to do more to help vaccinate the world and support public health globally.

“I don’t anticipate contention on the issue of vaccines. I anticipate convergence,” national security adviser Jake Sullivan told reporters Wednesday. “Because we’re all converging around the idea that we need to boost vaccine supply in a number of ways: sharing more of our own doses — and we’ll have more to say on that; helping get more manufacturing capacity around the world — we’ll have more to say on that; and, of course, doing what’s necessary across the chain of custody from when the vaccine is produced to when it gets in someone’s arms in the rural developing world, and we’ll have more to say on that.”

Last week, the White House unveiled plans to donate an initial allotment of 25 million doses of surplus vaccine overseas, mostly through the United Nations-backed COVAX program, promising infusions for South and Central America, Asia, Africa and others.

Officials say a quarter of that excess will be kept in reserve for emergencies and for the U.S. to share directly with allies and partners, including South Korea, Taiwan and Ukraine.

Sullivan noted that Biden has previously committed to turning the U.S. into a modern day “arsenal of democracies” for vaccines, but that the country also has health reasons for spreading vaccinations — preventing the rise of potentially dangerous variants — and geostrategic ones as well.

China and Russia have shared, with varying success, their domestically produced vaccines with some needy countries, often with hidden strings attached. Sullivan said Biden “does want to show — rallying the rest of the world’s democracies — that democracies are the countries that can best deliver solutions for people everywhere.”

The U.S.-produced mRNA vaccines have also proven to be more effective against both the original strain and more dangerous variants of COVID-19 than the more conventional vaccines produced by China and Russia. Some countries that have had success in deploying those conventional vaccines have nonetheless seen cases spike.

Biden’s decision to purchase the doses, officials said, was meant to keep them from getting locked up by richer nations that have the means to enter into purchasing agreements directly with manufacturers. Just last month, the European Commission signed an agreement to purchase as many as 1.8 billion Pfizer doses in the next two years, a significant share of the company’s upcoming production — though the bloc reserved the right to donate some of its doses to COVAX.

Global public health groups have been aiming to use this week’s G-7 meetings to press the nation’s wealthiest democracies to do more to share vaccines with the world, and Biden’s plans drew immediate praise toward that end.

Tom Hart, acting CEO at The ONE Campaign, a nonprofit that seeks to end poverty, said Biden’s announcement was “the kind of bold leadership that is needed to end this global pandemic.”

“We urge other G-7 countries to follow the U.S.’ example and donate more doses to COVAX,” he added. “If there was ever a time for global ambition and action to end the pandemic, it’s now.”

But others have called on the U.S. to do even more.

“Charity is not going to win the war against the coronavirus,” said Niko Lusiani, Oxfam America’s vaccine lead. “At the current rate of vaccinations, it would take low-income countries 57 years to reach the same level of protection as those in G-7 countries. That’s not only morally wrong, it’s self-defeating given the risk posed by coronavirus mutations.”

Biden last month broke with European allies to endorse waiving intellectual property rules at the World Trade Organization to promote vaccine production and equity. But many in his own administration acknowledge that the restrictions were not the driving cause of the global vaccine shortage, which has more to do with limited manufacturing capacity and shortages of delicate raw materials.

___

Miller reported from Washington.

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Politics

Federal probe: Protest not broken up due to Trump photo op

An internal government investigation has determined that the decision to forcibly clear racial justice protesters from an area in front of the White House last summer was not influenced by then-President Donald Trump’s plan to stage a Bible-toting photo opportunity at that spot.

The report released Wednesday by the Interior Department’s inspector general concludes that the protesters were cleared by U.S. Park Police last June 1 so that a contractor could get started installing new fencing.

The demonstrators were protesting the death of George Floyd, who died after a then-Minneapolis police officer knelt on his neck and pinned him to the ground for about 9 1/2 minutes. A half-hour after the Washington protesters were forced from the area with pepper pellets and flash-bangs, Trump walked across Lafayette Park amid the lingering scent of pepper spray and delivered a short speech while holding a Bible in front of St. John’s Church.

Park Police officials had already planned to clear the area and “had begun implementing the operational plan several hours before they knew of a potential Presidential visit to the park,” Inspector General Mark Lee Greenblatt said in a statement accompanying the report.

The report documents Trump’s attorney general, William Barr, encouraging commanders shortly before the push to clear the protesters because of Trump, but being dismissed.

In a remarkable exchange, the report recounts the testimony of an unnamed Park Police operations commander: “The Attorney General asked him, ‘Are these people still going to be here when POTUS (President of the United States) comes out?’ The USPP operations commander told us he had not known until then that the President would be coming out of the White House and into Lafayette Park. He said he replied to the Attorney General, ‘Are you freaking kidding me?’ and then hung his head and walked away. The Attorney General then left Lafayette Park.”

The report determined that the decision to clear the protesters was justified, but that law enforcement agencies on the scene failed to effectively communicate with each other and failed to communicate warnings to the protesters about the impending crackdown. Several different law enforcement agencies moved ahead of schedule and started engaging with protesters before the protesters had been sufficiently warned.

The confrontation and church photo-op capped several days of escalating tension and scattered violence. Nights of protests over Floyd’s death had resulted in scattered vandalism through the downtown area. Trump declared that Washington’s mayor, Muriel Bowser, was incapable of maintaining the peace and he called in his own security response.

The report details how on June 1, a contingent from the Bureau of Prisons arrived to the scene late, didn’t receive a full briefing and used pepper pellets on protesters “contrary to the USPP incident commander’s instructions.”

The conclusions, which deny any political influence on decisions and cite fog-of-war confusion for any missteps, are likely to be dismissed as insufficient by critics of last summer’s crackdown.

Lafayette Park, the Washington nexus of the last summer’s national wave of racial justice protests, is under Park Police jurisdiction; that agency falls under the Interior Department.

The new report focuses on the Park Police decision-making and its complicated interactions with various law enforcement entities, including the Secret Service and the Metropolitan Police Department.

It points out that “the USPP and the Secret Service did not use a shared radio channel to communicate” and determines that “weaknesses in communication and coordination may have contributed to confusion during the operation.”

Much of the criticism of the clearing, and the accusations of political influence, stem from the decision to move in before the 7 p.m. curfew that Bowser had set. The push surprised protesters and was criticized as unnecessarily confrontational after two nights of clashes and property damage.

The report concludes that Park Police commanders viewed the curfew as irrelevant. It cites an incident commander as saying, “We were not enforcing the Mayor’s curfew. We’re a Federal entity. We don’t work directly for the Mayor.”

It continues that commanders on the scene ”did not believe protesters would comply with the Mayor’s June 1 curfew order or that waiting would necessarily reduce unrest.”

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Politics

US drops Trump order targeting TikTok, plans its own review

The White House dropped Trump-era executive orders intended to ban the popular apps TikTok and WeChat and will conduct its own review aimed at identifying national security risks with software applications tied to China, officials said Wednesday.

A new executive order directs the Commerce Department to undertake what officials describe as an “evidence-based” analysis of transactions involving apps that are manufactured or supplied or controlled by China. Officials are particularly concerned about apps that collect users’ personal data or have connections to Chinese military or intelligence activities.

In revoking some of President Donald Trump’s blanket-style orders against Chinese tech companies and replacing them with a narrower approach, the Biden administration has not actually weighed in yet on whether TikTok and other apps pose a danger to Americans.

But a senior administration official said Wednesday that the Trump actions weren’t “always implemented in the soundest fashion” and the aim of the review is to set up clear criteria to evaluate specific data security and privacy risks for each app. He said that could lead to a range of potential future actions on an app-by-app basis.

“We want to take a tailored, tough approach here,” he said.

The department will also make recommendations on how to further protect Americans’ genetic and personal health information, and will address the risks of certain software apps connected to China or other adversaries, according to senior administration officials.

TikTok on Wednesday declined to comment. WeChat did not respond to a request for comment.

The Trump administration’s attempted bans didn’t hold up legally as courts blocked them, and also “ran up against this critique that they were mimicking China’s Great Firewall,” said Samm Sacks, a fellow at Yale Law School’s Paul Tsai China Center. “What the Biden administration wants to do is maintain an open, secure internet that doesn’t take a page from Beijing’s playbook, while addressing legitimate risk.”

The Biden administration’s move reflects ongoing concern that Americans’ personal data could be exposed by popular apps tied to China, a chief U.S. economic and political rival. The White House and Congress have both taken action to address Beijing’s technological advancement.

The Biden administration last week expanded a Trump-era list of Chinese companies that Americans can’t invest in because of purported links to the Chinese military and surveillance. Companies on the list include China’s state-owned telecommunications companies, telecom equipment maker Huawei and Chinese oil company China National Offshore Oil Corp.

On Tuesday, the Senate passed a bill that aims to boost U.S. semiconductor production and the development of artificial intelligence and other technology in the face of growing international competition. The bill would also ban the federal government’s use of Chinese-made drones.

The new executive order should lead to a framework for protecting Americans’ data from China, rather than targeting specific companies, and could pressure Congress to enact a data-security law in the years ahead, said Paul Triolo, a tech policy expert at the Eurasia Group consultancy.

Courts had blocked the Trump administration’s efforts last year to ban TikTok, a video app widely popular with young people, and messaging service WeChat, but a national-security review of TikTok by a government group called the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States, or CFIUS, is ongoing. CFIUS had set deadlines for TikTok to divest its U.S. operations, but such a sale never happened.

Last year, the Trump administration brokered a deal that would have had U.S. corporations Oracle and Walmart take a large stake in the Chinese-owned app on national security grounds. Oracle didn’t returned requests for comment on Wednesday. Walmart declined to comment.

The Biden administration earlier this year had backed off President Donald Trump’s attempts to ban TikTok and WeChat as it reviewed national security threats posed by Chinese technology companies. The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit has put on hold a case challenging Trump’s TikTok divestment order.

A cybersecurity and privacy analysis of TikTok published in March by the internet watchdog group Citizen Lab found no evidence of malicious behavior and said TikTok’s practices of collecting personal data and analyzing users’ behavior were no worse than other major social platforms such as Facebook.

“Our research shows that there is no overt data transmission to the Chinese government by TikTok,” the report said. It added that TikTok’s service did not contact any servers within China, but it was still theoretically possible that servers outside China could later transfer user data to China-based servers.

Citizen Lab, based at the University of Toronto, also described a “plausible” though speculative scenario in which the Chinese government could use one of its national security laws to force TikTok’s parent company, ByteDance, to turn over user data, but said there’s no evidence China has yet exerted such pressure on the company.

____

O’Brien reported from Providence, Rhode Island, and Arbel from New York.

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In UK for first foreign trip, Biden to announce vaccine plan

Embarking on the first overseas trip of his term, President Joe Biden is eager to reassert the United States on the world stage, steadying European allies deeply shaken by his predecessor and pushing democracy as the only bulwark to rising forces of authoritarianism.

Biden has set the stakes for his eight-day trip in sweeping terms, believing the West must publicly demonstrate it can compete economically with China as the world emerges from the coronavirus pandemic.

Shortly before arriving at Royal Air Force Mildenhall, where Biden was to speak to U.S. troops, people briefed on the matter confirmed that the Biden administration had brokered an agreement with Pfizer to purchase 500 million COVID-19 vaccine doses to be donated to 92 lower income countries and the African Union over the next year.

Two hundred million doses — enough to fully protect 100 million people — will be shared this year according to two people briefed on the matter, with the balance to be donated in the first half of 2022.

National security adviser Jake Sullivan told reporters Wednesday on Air Force One that Biden was committed to sharing vaccines because it was in the public health and strategic interests of the U.S. As Biden embarks on his first foreign trip, he is aiming to show “that democracies are the countries that can best deliver solutions for people everywhere.”

“As he said in his joint session (address), we were the ‘arsenal of democracy’ in World War II,” Sullivan said. “We’re going to be the ‘arsenal of vaccines’ over this next period to help end the pandemic.”

Before leaving Washington, Biden told reporters the trip is about making clear to the leaders of China and Russia that the United States and Europe “are tight.”

Building toward his trip-ending summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin, Biden will aim to reassure European capitals that the United States can once again be counted on as a dependable partner to thwart Moscow’s aggression both on their eastern front and their internet battlefields.

The trip will be far more about messaging than specific actions or deals. And the paramount priority for Biden is to convince the world that his Democratic administration is not just a fleeting deviation in the trajectory of an American foreign policy that many allies fear irrevocably drifted toward a more transactional outlook under former President Donald Trump.

“The trip, at its core, will advance the fundamental thrust of Joe Biden’s foreign policy,” said national security adviser Jake Sullivan, “to rally the world’s democracies to tackle the great challenges of our time.”

Biden’s to-do list is ambitious.

In their face-to-face sit-down in Geneva, Biden wants to privately pressure Putin to end myriad provocations, including cybersecurity attacks on American businesses by Russian-based hackers, the jailing of opposition leader Alexei Navalny and repeated overt and covert efforts by the Kremlin to interfere in U.S. elections.

Biden is also looking to rally allies on their COVID-19 response and to urge them to coalesce around a strategy to check emerging economic and national security competitor China even as the U.S. expresses concern about Europe’s economic links to Moscow. Biden also wants to nudge outlying allies, including Australia, to make more aggressive commitments to the worldwide effort to curb global warming.

The week-plus journey is a big moment for Biden, who traveled the world for decades as vice president and as chair of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and will now step off Air Force One onto international soil as commander in chief. He will face world leaders still grappling with the virus and rattled by four years of Trump’s inward-looking foreign policy and moves that strained longtime alliances as the Republican former president made overtures to strongmen.

“In this moment of global uncertainty, as the world still grapples with a once-in-a-century pandemic,” Biden wrote in a Washington Post op-ed previewing his diplomatic efforts, “this trip is about realizing America’s renewed commitment to our allies and partners, and demonstrating the capacity of democracies to both meet the challenges and deter the threats of this new age.”

The president first travels to Britain for a summit of the Group of Seven leaders and then Brussels for a NATO summit and a meeting with the heads of the European Union. It comes at a moment when Europeans have diminished expectations for what they can expect of U.S. leadership on the foreign stage.

Central and Eastern Europeans are desperately hoping to bind the U.S. more tightly to their security. Germany is looking to see the U.S. troop presence maintained there so it doesn’t need to build up its own. France, meanwhile, has taken the tack that the U.S. can’t be trusted as it once was and that the European Union must pursue greater strategic autonomy going forward.

“I think the concern is real that the Trumpian tendencies in the U.S. could return full bore in the midterms or in the next presidential election,” said Alexander Vershbow, a former U.S. diplomat and once deputy secretary general of NATO.

The sequencing of the trip is deliberate: Biden consulting with Western European allies for much of a week as a show of unity before his summit with Putin.

His first stop late Wednesday will be an address to U.S. troops stationed in Britain, and the next day he sits down with British Prime Minster Boris Johnson. The two men will meet a day ahead of the G-7 summit to be held above the craggy cliffs of Cornwall overlooking the Atlantic Ocean.

The most tactile of politicians, Biden has grown frustrated by the diplomacy-via-Zoom dynamics of the pandemic and has relished the ability to again have face-to-face meetings that allow him to size up and connect with world leaders. While Biden himself is a veteran statesman, many of the world leaders he will see in England, including Johnson and French President Emmanuel Macron, took office after Biden left the vice presidency. Another, Germany’s Angela Merkel, will leave office later this year.

There are several potential areas of tension. On climate change, the U.S. is aiming to regain its credibility after Trump pulled the country back from the fight against global warming. Biden could also feel pressure on trade, an issue to which he’s yet to give much attention. And with the United States well supplied with COVID-19 vaccines yet struggling to persuade some of its own citizens to use it, leaders whose inoculation campaigns have been slower will surely pressure Biden to share more surplus around the globe.

Another central focus will be China. Biden and the other G-7 leaders will announce an infrastructure financing program for developing countries that is meant to compete directly with Beijing’s Belt-and-Road Initiative. But not every European power has viewed China in as harsh a light as Biden, who has painted the rivalry with the techno-security state as the defining competition for the 21st century.

The European Union has avoided taking as strong a stance on Beijing’s crackdown on Hong Kong’s democracy movement or treatment of Uyghur Muslims and other ethnic minorities in the western Xinjiang province as the Biden administration may like. But there are signs that Europe is willing to put greater scrutiny on Beijing.

The EU in March announced sanctions targeting four Chinese officials involved with human rights abuses in Xinjiang. Beijing, in turn, responded by imposing sanctions on several members of the European Parliament and other Europeans critical of the Chinese Communist Party.

Biden is also scheduled to meet with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan while in Brussels, a face-to-face meeting between two leaders who have had many fraught moments in their relationship over the years.

Biden waited until April to call Erdogan for the first time as president. In that call, he informed the Turkish leader that he would formally recognize that the systematic killings and deportations of hundreds of thousands of Armenians by Ottoman Empire forces in the early 20th century were “genocide” — using a term for the atrocities that his White House predecessors had avoided for decades over concerns of alienating Turkey.

The trip finale will be Biden’s meeting with Putin.

Biden has taken a very different approach to Russia than Trump’s friendly outreach. Their sole summit, held in July 2018 in Helsinki, was marked by Trump’s refusal to side with U.S. intelligence agencies over Putin’s denials of Russian interference in the election two years earlier.

Biden could well be challenged by unrest at home as Russia looks to exploit the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection and the debate over voting rights to undermine the U.S. position as a global role model. The American president, in turn, is expected to push Russia to quell its global meddling.

“By and large, these are not meetings on outcomes, these are ‘get to know you again’ meetings for the U.S. and Europe,” said Richard Haass, president of the Council on Foreign Relations. “It’s about delivering a message to Putin, to reviving old alliances and to demonstrate again that the U.S. is back on the right course.”

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‘There is stuff’: Enduring mysteries trail US report on UFOs

The blob, captured on distant, fuzzy video by Navy pilots, seems to skitter just above the ocean waves at improbable speed, with no discernible means of propulsion or lift. “Oh my gosh, man,” one aviator says to another as they laugh at the oddity. “What … is it?”

Is it a bird? A plane? Super drone? An extraterrestrial something?

The U.S. government has been taking a hard look at unidentified flying objects like this one. A report summarizing what the U.S. knows about “unidentified aerial phenomena” — better known as UFOs — is expected to be made public this month.

There won’t be an alien unmasking. Two officials briefed on the report say it found no extraterrestrial link to the sightings reported and captured on video. The report won’t rule out a link to another country, according to the officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they weren’t authorized to discuss it.

While the broad conclusions have now been reported, the full report may still present a broader picture of what the government knows. The anticipation surrounding the report shows how a topic normally confined to science fiction and a small, often dismissed group of researchers has hit the mainstream.

Worried about national security threats from adversaries, lawmakers ordered an investigation and public accounting of phenomena that the government has been loath to talk about for generations.

“There is stuff flying in our airspace,” Republican Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida, one of the senators who pressed for the probe, recently told Fox News. “We don’t know what it is. We need to find out.”

Congress late last year instructed the director of national intelligence to provide “a detailed analysis of unidentified aerial phenomena data” from multiple agencies and report in 180 days. That time is about up. The intelligence office wouldn’t say this past week when the full document will be out.

The bill passed by Congress asks the intelligence director for “any incidents or patterns that indicate a potential adversary may have achieved breakthrough aerospace capabilities that could put United States strategic or conventional forces at risk.”

The chief concern is whether hostile countries are fielding aerial technology so advanced and weird that it befuddles and threatens the world’s largest military power. But when lawmakers talk about it, they tend to leave themselves a little wiggle room in case it’s something else — whether more prosaic than a military rival or, you know, more cosmic.

“Right now there are a lot of unanswered questions,” Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff of California told NBC this week. “If other nations have capabilities that we don’t know of, we want to find out. If there’s some explanation other than that, we want to learn that, too.”

Luis Elizondo, former head of the Pentagon’s Advanced Aerospace Threat Identification Program, said he didn’t believe that the sightings were of a foreign power’s technology in part because it would have been nearly impossible to keep that secret. Elizondo has accused the Defense Department of trying to discredit him and says there’s much more information that the U.S. has kept classified.

“We live in an incredible universe,” Elizondo said. “There’s all sorts of hypotheses that suggest that the three dimensional universe which we live in isn’t quite so easy to explain.”

But Michael Shermer, editor of Skeptic magazine, is skeptical.

The science historian, a longtime analyst of UFO theories and other phenomena, said he’s seen too many blurry images of supposed alien encounters to be convinced by still more blurry footage of blobs from airplanes. This is a time, he notes, when several billion people worldwide have smartphones that take crisp images and satellites precisely render detail on the ground.

“Show me the body, show me the spacecraft, or show me the really high quality videos and photographs,” he said in an interview. “And I’ll believe.”

Mick West, a prominent researcher of unexplained phenomena and debunker of conspiracy theories, said it was right for the government to investigate and report on the potential national security implications of sightings captured in now-declassified videos.

“Any time there is some kind of unidentified object coming through military airspace, that’s a real issue that needs to be looked into,” he told AP.

“But the videos, even though they’re showing unidentified objects, they’re not showing amazing unidentified objects.”

Pilots and sky-watchers have long reported sporadic sightings of UFOs in U.S. airspace, seemingly at unusual speeds or trajectories. In most cases, those mysteries evaporate under examination.

In 1960, the CIA said 6,500 objects had been reported to the U.S. Air Force over the prior 13 years. The Air Force concluded there was no evidence those sightings were “inimical or hostile” or related to “interplanetary space ships,” the CIA said.

Reports of UFOs have, of course, persisted since then. Some people who study the topic argue investigations have been limited by the stigma of being linked to conspiracy theories or talk of little green men storming Earth. They note that the government has a history of stonewalling and lying about the unexplained.

It took 50 years for the government to offer what it hoped was a full debunking of claims that alien bodies were recovered at a crash site in New Mexico in 1947. In 1997, the Air Force said the Roswell “bodies″ were dummies used in parachute tests, recent ancestors of the car-crash dummies of today.

Retired Air Force Col. Richard Weaver, who wrote one of the official reports on the Roswell rumors, tried to assure the public that the government isn’t competent enough to cover up a genuine alien sighting. “We have a hard time keeping a secret,” he said, “let alone putting together a decent conspiracy.”

A recent turning point came in December 2017, when The New York Times revealed a five-year Pentagon program to investigate UFOs. The Pentagon subsequently released videos, leaked earlier, of military pilots encountering shadowy objects they couldn’t identify.

One was the video clip of the aviators tracking the blob above the ocean off the U.S. coast in 2015, dubbed Gofast. In another from that year, labeled Gimbal, an unexplained object is tracked as it soars high along the clouds, traveling against the wind. “There’s a whole fleet of them,” one naval aviator tells another, though only one indistinct object is shown. “It’s rotating.”

In 2019, the Navy announced it would create a formal process for its pilots to report unidentified aerial phenomena, or UAPs. Last August, the Defense Department created a task force dedicated to the matter. The mission was to “detect, analyze and catalog UAPs” that could endanger the U.S.

In an era of increasingly sophisticated drone aircraft, now seen as a risk to sensitive domestic military sites such as nuclear missile bases, the focus has been more on foreign rivals than on any supposed visitors from another planet. Yet the formation of the task force stood as a rare acknowledgment from the government that UFOs posed a potential national security concern.

More recently, a story on CBS’ “60 Minutes” featured the declassified videos and raised questions about what intelligence the U.S. government has.

Rubio, top Republican on the Senate Intelligence Committee and its former chairman, said it is important for investigators to follow up on the reports of its pilots and make the findings public. “I am going off what our military men and their radars and their eyesight is telling them,” Rubio said. “There are multiple highly trained, highly competent people.”

Yet things in the sky are very often not what they seem. Shermer rattles off examples of how phenomena that appear otherworldly may be tediously of this Earth.

“Ninety to 95% of all UFO sightings,” he said, “can be explained as weather balloons, flares, sky lanterns, planes flying in formation, secret military aircraft, birds reflecting the sun, planes reflecting the sun, blimps, helicopters, the planets Venus or Mars, meteors or meteorite space junk, satellites, swamp gas … ball lightning, ice crystals reflecting light off clouds, lights on the ground or lights reflected on a cockpit window, temperature inversions, punch clouds.”

“For any of these things to be real, we need something more than these grainy videos and blurry photographs,” he said.

“We need really some hard evidence, extraordinary evidence, because this would be one of the most extraordinary claims ever if it was true.”

___

Associated Press video journalists Dan Huff and Nathan Ellgren and AP National Security Writer Robert Burns contributed to this report.

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News Politics

Barefoot Is Legal Helps Fight Against Xinjiang Labor Camps

Shoeless Is Legal organizer David Kelman has declared that the 501c3 non-benefit will bring issues to light of the work camps in China.

During the few days of April 9-11,2021, Mr. Kelman will bring issues to light of these work camps by urging everybody to blacklist shoes for the three days and go shoeless. This is in light of the overall shock and fights in regards to the common freedoms issues. A hashtag was made, #NoFootPrisons, for concerned residents to share.

“These are violations against mankind. Individuals are being gathered together and set in death camps for constrained work. They are detainees dependent on their strict convictions. Many significant companies overall are utilizing this work as an approach to make items less expensive. Biden even supported this after he was initiated. We need to remain with our kindred people and disgrace the organizations benefitting.”

Organizations like Nike, Adidas, H&M, Tommy Hilfiger, among others, have been disregarded overall as of late as significant clients of this work situated in the Xinjiang locale. A great many individuals holding strict convictions as Uyghurs, Christians, Buddhists, and others have been confined.

Kelman has proposed the multi day time span to show imagery of not wearing shoes to show support for eliminating constrained work. “In the event that you are shoeless, it is showing you needn’t bother with their items. You can work in a world and purchase things without footwear from constrained work camps.” he shares .

There are no laws in the United States or Canada including driving a vehicle, going to a store, or eating while shoeless.

NOTE: NIKE has an undated letter expressing their Code Of Conduct precluding this work. Notwithstanding, it is unsubstantiated as of now. There are joins identified with explanations from 2020. While Nike refers to they don’t straightforwardly source cotton, it is asserted that recognizability of crude materials in a space of progressing center. It doesn’t have all the earmarks of being composed as of late. None of the other affirmed organizations proclamations with respect to this matter have been found.

Barefoot Is Legal
6156 Carl Ave, Las Vegas, NV 89108
Press inquiries are handled via email: press@barefootislegal.org or by phone 844-522-7882.

ABOUT Barefoot Is Legal: Barefoot Is Legal (barefootislegal.org) was launched in 2015 by David Kelman, and in 2017 became a 501c3 non-profit. Barefoot Is Legal shares health information, provides support, & encourages people to live a barefoot lifestyle.

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Politics

eCom Scotland develops eLearning materials on complying with the UN Child Rights Convention

Following the news, in March, that Scotland is to become the first devolved nation in the world to directly incorporate the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) into domestic law, a webinar has explored the legal and service delivery implications for the implementation of this Convention into Scottish law.

In particular, the webinar – held on 3rd June – examined how anyone undertaking functions or providing services to children can meet the challenge complying with the UNCRC requirements, reflecting them in their day-to day-running, culture and practices.

Helen Robertson, External Relations Director of the digital learning and assessment specialist, eCom Scotland, who attended the webinar, commented, “Scotland’s taking the lead in adopting this Convention might appear to be showing up the other three nations within the UK – and I’m sure this move, due to come into effect in Scotland this autumn, will put pressure on England, Wales and Northern Ireland to follow suit.

“To help those involved in implementing the Convention’s requirements, eCom is supporting Children’s Hearings Scotland as well as with Scotland’s national children’s charity, Children 1st, in developing relevant eLearning materials for their audiences. These materials should contribute to building confidence and competence for those involved in the changes in practice and outcomes for children,” Helen added.

The webinar discussed the implications of putting children’s human rights at the heart of decision-making, including instituting a proactive culture of accountability for children’s rights. Having covered how organisations should plan and prepare for compliance with the Convention, it suggested how such compliance could be demonstrated in practical terms.

“The webinar focused on how public sector bodies – and anyone undertaking functions or providing services to children with public money – can meet the challenge of acting compatibly with the UNCRC requirements, reflecting them in their day-to-day running, culture and practices,” explained Helen.

“The Convention requires public authorities to make the best interests of children a primary consideration in their decision making and service delivery, obliging them to actively protect children from violence, injury or abuse. They must also recognise the rights of children with disabilities to enjoy a full and decent life and to uphold children’s rights to an adequate standard of living.

“Complying with legislation is one thing but actively and successfully promoting children’s rights is another,” Helen continued. “One of the ways in which organisations can get it right – or at least minimise the chances of getting it wrong – is to allow their employees ready access to high-quality learning materials. With 25 years’ experience of producing such eLearning materials – and a customer cohort of over 1m people – we feel that eCom is well-placed to meet this need.”

eCom Scotland
18B Dickson Street
Dunfermline
Fife, KY12 7SL
Scotland

About eCom
eCom creates innovative learning solutions – aimed at increasing learning engagement and driving productivity – to help organisations achieve their goals. With offices in Dunfermline, Scotland, and Athens, Georgia, in the USA, but with customers from around the world, eCom focuses on the delivery, tracking and reporting of workforce learning and development through innovative technologies. Its products and services address a range of workforce management, development and training challenges, including eLearning, online assessment, blended learning, competency management and accreditation.

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Arizona Sec. of State Says Audit Could ‘Produce the Result That They Want’

Arizona Secretary of State Katie Hobbs has said that the continuous political race review in Maricopa County, Arizona, has made an environment “prime for cooking the books” to create the coordinators’ ideal result.

Hobbs, a Democrat, addressed CNN’s Jake Tapper on Thursday about the questionable review of the 2020 official political race results and examined how it is being directed.

The Republican-controlled state governing body requested the review and it’s being completed by an organization called Cyber Ninjas, which has no past experience evaluating decisions.

Tapper outlined for Hobbs, “So we should discuss this ‘fraudit’ going on,” prior to featuring that coordinators had been utilizing blue and dark pens as a component of the cycle.

“Your office thinks this is not kidding,” Tapper said.

“On the off chance that you go into any classification place, you won’t track down a dark or blue pen anyplace,” Hobbs said.

“You can’t have that shading ink around live voting forms. It can conceivably change a voting form. To keep away from any blunder, there’s just red pens in those rooms. We cautioned right off the bat a rundown of safety efforts we sent and said these ought to be followed when taking care of these polling forms and gear,” she said.

Hobbs added that her office had raised the issue of blue and dark pens right off the bat in the review yet that they were all the while seeing the pens utilized, saying the review was “proceeding to overlook that and proceeding to do this.”

The Democrat, who as of late reported a run for legislative head of Arizona, disclosed to Tapper she needed to feature “the absence of techniques, the absence of best practices, the absence of anything set up that will loan to the believability of whatever outcomes they produce.”

“This doesn’t even intently take after what you would find in an authentic post-political race review that was attempting to check political decision results,” Hobbs said.

“Furthermore, we realize that they are making an environment that is prime for cooking the books so they can deliver the outcome that they need to create,” she said.

Coordinators of the Maricopa County review have been blamed for seeking after fear inspired notions, remembering searching for bamboo strands for voting forms dependent on an unwarranted case that a few voting forms were dispatched in from Asia. Two past reviews discovered no proof of boundless citizen misrepresentation in Maricopa County.

Hobbs confronted provocation and demise dangers as she endeavored to guard the trustworthiness of the political race in Arizona. As secretary of state, she is the state’s top political race official. President Joe Biden won Arizona in 2020 by around 10,000 votes.

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Politics

After 2-year battle, House panel to interview Trump counsel

The House Judiciary Committee is poised to question former White House counsel Don McGahn behind closed doors on Friday, two years after House Democrats originally sought his testimony as part of investigations into former President Donald Trump.

The long-awaited interview is the result of an agreement reached last month in federal court. House Democrats — then investigating whether Trump tried to obstruct the Justice Department’s probes into his presidential campaign’s ties to Russia — originally sued after McGahn defied an April 2019 subpoena on Trump’s orders.

That same month, the Justice Department released a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report on the matter. In the report, Mueller pointedly did not exonerate President Donald Trump of obstruction of justice but also did not recommend prosecuting him, citing Justice Department policy against indicting a sitting president. Mueller’s report quoted extensively from interviews with McGahn, who described the president’s efforts to stifle the investigation.

While the Judiciary panel eventually won its fight for McGahn’s testimony, the court agreement almost guarantees they won’t learn anything new. The two sides agreed that McGahn will only be questioned about information attributed to him in publicly available portions of Mueller’s report.

Still, House Democrats kept the case going, even past Trump’s presidency, and are moving forward with the interview to make an example of the former White House counsel. House Judiciary Committee Chair Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., said the agreement for McGahn’s testimony is a good-faith compromise that “satisfies our subpoena, protects the Committee’s constitutional duty to conduct oversight in the future, and safeguards sensitive executive branch prerogatives.”

It is unclear what House Democrats will do with the testimony, which they sought before twice impeaching Trump. The Senate acquitted Trump of impeachment charges both times.

As White House counsel, McGahn had an insider’s view of many of the episodes Mueller and his team examined for potential obstruction of justice during the Russia investigation. McGahn proved a pivotal — and damning — witness against Trump, with his name mentioned hundreds of times in the text of the Mueller report and its footnotes.

He described to investigators the president’s repeated efforts to choke off the probe and directives he said he received from the president that unnerved him.

He recounted how Trump had demanded that he contact then-Attorney General Jeff Sessions to order him to unrecuse himself from the Russia investigation. McGahn also said Trump had implored him to tell the deputy attorney general at the time, Rod Rosenstein, to remove Mueller from his position because of perceived conflicts of interest — and, after that episode was reported in the media, to publicly and falsely deny that demand had ever been made.

McGahn also described the circumstances leading up to Trump’s firing of James Comey as FBI director, including the president’s insistence on including in the termination letter the fact that Comey had reassured Trump that he was not personally under investigation.

And he was present for a critical conversation early in the Trump administration, when Sally Yates, just before she was fired as acting attorney general as a holdover Obama appointee, relayed concerns to McGahn about new national security adviser Michael Flynn. She raised the possibility that Flynn’s conversations with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak — and his subsequent interview by the FBI — left him vulnerable to blackmail.

Trump’s Justice Department fought efforts to have McGahn testify, but U.S. District Judge Ketanji Brown Jackson in 2019 rejected Trump’s arguments that his close advisers were immune from congressional subpoena. President Joe Biden has nominated Jackson to the appeals court in Washington.